Review

If you thought you loved craft beer, just ask an Ethiopian about tej. A type of honey wine renowned for its spicy-sweetness and potency, the popular drink is as integral to Ethiopian culture as Stone IPA is to San Diego’s. But Ethiopians have been making tej a lot longer than San Diegans have been drinking beer. Though it’s unclear when it all started, mentions of tej in the region appear as far back as the third century A.D. And while the wine was once reserved for emperors and their cronies, tej is so popular nowadays that it’s considered the East AfricanContinue Reading
Review
, , ,
Muzita is an Abyssinian Bistro which serves Ethiopian or Eritrean food. What this really means is that to eat, one uses their hands and a special bread called injera to hold the food. The injera is a cross between an Indian roti and cake in that it is rolled out in sheets, but is very light and fluffy in texture. At Muzita, the injera is made in-house. The actual cuisine is somewhat of a cross between North African stews and Indian curries.  Entrees served in a large family style plate are even covered with a mini straw tagine-like cover. “teff encrusted bamya –Continue Reading
Review
, , , ,
To say Muzita Abyssinian Bistro is a family affair is an understatement. “My mom runs the kitchen,” said Abel Woldemichael of his mother Letenegus Araya. “My wife and I run the restaurant — the day-to-day operations. We cook in the kitchen, too. If we want to change the menu, we consult my mom because the recipes are hers.” The Eritrean/Ethiopian bistro in University Heights is named after Woldemichael’s sister, Muzit, who became a quadriplegic 13 years ago from an aneurysm. “We called her the magnet of our family. She would gather us together and it was always centered around aContinue Reading
Review
, , , , ,
Take my word, the cuisine of the Horn of Africa is fabulous — but to know that, you have to taste it; and in San Diego, relatively few people have enjoyed the pleasure. With Muzita, we may have a breakthrough restaurant that introduces this food to all who don’t know yet what they’re missing. When I moved here from the Bay Area, the state of local North African restaurants came as a shock. They were a couple of low-price “dives” in City Heights, “starving student” eateries. Back home, the much larger Ethiopian community in Oakland made Ethiopian food a deliciousContinue Reading
Review
, , , ,
The gourmet ghetto along Park Boulevard — that international stretch of quality dining in the heart of University Heights — has a new prime-time date spot. My guess: Couples go to Muzita Abyssinian Bistro for its fresh, uncomplicated take on Ethiopian and Eritrean food — it balances out romantic complications. Or it’s because the converted bungalow is low-lit, cozy, somewhere you and the S.O. would happily hole up during a monsoon. All right, it’s the eating with your hands part: very sensual. And Abel Woldemichael, a fine-boned restaurateur with dreadlocks hanging like dark ropes down his back, is there toContinue Reading
Review
, , , ,